General

Brown Rice and Pineal Gland Health

The following thoughts come from an article in the Autumn 2016 issue of Macrobiotics Today by Edward Esko on the pineal gland.
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There is a large secret within the macrobiotic diet that very few understand. Note the unique structure of the pineal gland. As the French philosopher Rene Descartes understood, the pineal gland is the only structure in the brain that was unified and not divided into left and right. Compared to divided structures, that unified structure is highly yang or contracted.

Now among grains, among beans, among seeds, if you look at them, you see a division or split between left and right. Beans are divided, seeds are divided, and grains such as barley, millet, and wheat are divided. The only grain that is not split or divided, but completely unified is brown rice. It is no wonder that countries and regions of the world that ate brown rice developed the arts of meditation and unified spirituality.

Brown rice, especially short grain brown rice, is unified. Because of that, short grain brown rice is the central food for toning and conditioning the pineal gland. Eating brown rice on a daily basis and chewing it well heals and strengthens the pineal gland. All foods are made of energy and project an aura. The aura of brown rice and other cereal grains is golden white. Photos of rice growing in the field display a golden aura that you can see from a distance. That golden color matches the inner golden light that becomes visible when you open the third eye.

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Brown Rice and Wild Rice Salad

The following text and recipe come from an article in the Autumn 2016 issue of Macrobiotics Today by Angelika (Angie) Bertacco and is excerpted from Eating the Wu Way by Steven Acuff and Angelika Bertacco.
Rice and Whole Grains

Fibrous whole grains have been the traditional food of mankind through the ages. George Ohsawa, the original macrobiotic teacher, taught that brown rice had the optimal balance of the Yin and the Yang. Short grain brown rice is a popular staple in the macrobiotic way of eating that gets sweeter the longer you chew it.

Short grain brown rice has a higher nutrient and fiber density than long grain. Chewing brings out the sweetness in brown rice, and short grain tastes sweeter than long grain.

Soaking brown rice and other grains before cooking makes them easier to chew and digest. Soaking also breaks down the phytic acid in the grain, which disrupts mineral absorption.

Grains soak optimally for 24 hours, but at least 8 hours. Adding the acidity of a shot of vinegar, lemon juice or pickle juice strengthens the soaking effect and speeds up the process. After soaking, rinse with fresh water. Soaking activates phytase, the enzyme that breaks down phytic acid. However, oats have very little phytase and the best way to get rid of the phytic acid in oats is for each cup of whole oats to add a tablespoon of freshly crushed whole buckwheat groats to the soaking water.

Brown Rice and Wild Rice Salad

4 cups cooked brown rice with wild rice
1 cup corn kernels, steamed
½ cup pine nuts, pecans or walnuts, chopped
½ cup pickled cucumber, chopped
½ cup celery, finely sliced
½ cup green spring onions, finely sliced
¼ cup black olives, pitted and halved
½ cup fresh flat-leaf parsley or basil leaves, roughly chopped
Dressing
¼ cup olive oil
1 Tbsp lemon or lime juice
1 Tbsp whole-grain mustard or coconut mayonnaise
1 tsp rice syrup
Ume vinegar, to taste

Combine all the ingredients for the rice salad in a large bowl. Whisk the dressing ingredients in a small bowl until smooth. Pour over the rice and toss. Adjust seasonings.

 

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